Anterior Callosotomy Added to Frontal Lobectomy in Frontal Lobe Epilepsy

  • N. Giard
  • I. Rouleau
  • A. Bouthillier
  • G. Bouvier
  • J. M. Saint-Hilaire
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 45)

Abstract

Frontal lobe epilepsies are much more complex to investigate than those epilepsies of temporal lobe origin. Rapid diffusion of ictal discharge, typical of frontal lobe epilepsy, often renders a clear definition of the epileptogenic zone impossible unless invasive recordings are performed.1 Even with the use of such invasive techniques, the results of frontal lobe cortectomy are not always satisfactory2 and this is certainly so when compared with the results of temporal lobe cortectomies.

Keywords

Penicillin Astrocytoma Aphasia Oligodendroglioma Amobarbital 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Giard
    • 1
  • I. Rouleau
    • 2
  • A. Bouthillier
    • 3
  • G. Bouvier
    • 3
  • J. M. Saint-Hilaire
    • 1
  1. 1.Service de Neurologie Hôpital Notre-DameUniversité de MontréalCanada
  2. 2.Service de Neurologie Hôpital Notre-DameUniversité du Québec à MontréalCanada
  3. 3.Service de Neurochirurgie Hôpital Notre-DameUniversité de MontréalCanada

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