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Histological Study of Tobacco Thrips Feeding on Peanut Foliage

  • Forrest L. Mitchell
  • Virginia K. Lowry
  • Kenya K. Kresta
  • J. W. SmithJr.
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 276)

Abstract

Frankliniella fusca, tobacco thrips, were caged on peanut leaflets. Leaflets were embedded in paraffin, sectioned, stained, and microscopically examined. Mouth cone imprints were visible in the epidermis and palisade tissue. Heavy salivation into the wound was observed. Feeding by larvae was less damaging than by adults Both caused scarification of the leaf surface. Because expanding leaflets are the feeding site of choice for larvae, even minor damage is visible due to growth of cells around the feeding site. Immunofluorescence of tomato spotted wilt virus in peanut leaves was attempted to correlate thrips feeding sites with virus infection sites.

Keywords

Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Tomato Spot Wilt Virus Larval Thrips Palisade Tissue Mouth Cone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Forrest L. Mitchell
    • 1
  • Virginia K. Lowry
    • 2
  • Kenya K. Kresta
    • 1
  • J. W. SmithJr.
    • 2
  1. 1.Texas Agricultural Experiment StationStephenvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of EntomologyTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA

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