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The Role of Attachment in Perceived Support and the Stress and Coping Process

  • J. T. Ptacek
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Part of the The Springer Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

Sandy, a 43-year-old married mother of three, was recently diagnosed with and treated for breast cancer. Despite having had a radical mastectomy and 6 weeks of adjunctive radiation treatment, Sandy has maintained a positive mood. She attributes her good adjustment to her resolve to “beat the disease,” her commitment to follow all her physician’s recommendations, and a husband and friends who “have been there for her” when things were at their toughest.

Keywords

Social Support Coping Strategy Attachment Style Attachment Theory Cognitive Appraisal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. T. Ptacek
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyBucknell UniversityLewisburgUSA

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