The Impact of Marital and Social Network Support on Quality of Parenting

  • Ronald L. Simons
  • Christine Johnson
Chapter
Part of the The Springer Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

Several decades of research have demonstrated a link between quality of parenting and child development (Baumrind, 1993; Maccoby, 1992; Maccoby & Martin, 1983). These studies suggest that a parenting style characterized by warmth, inductive reasoning, appropriate monitoring, and clear communication fosters a child’s cognitive functioning, social skills, moral development, and psychological adjustment. In contrast, parenting practices involving hostility, rejection, and coercion have been shown to increase the probability of negative developmental outcomes such as delinquency, psychopathology, academic failure, and substance abuse. These findings point to the importance of studies concerned with identifying the determinants of parental behavior. This chapter presents our model for integrating theory and research on this topic. The model identifies social support as an important cause of variations in quality of parenting.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald L. Simons
    • 1
  • Christine Johnson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and the Center for Family Research in Rural Mental HealthIowa State UniversityAmesUSA

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