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Antifungal and Hemolytic Activity of Aerial Parts of Alfalfa (Medicago) Species in Relation to Saponin Composition

  • M. Jurzysta
  • G. R. Waller
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 404)

Abstract

Saponins occurring in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) are composed of a complicated mixture of triterpenoid glycosides1–3. According to the structure of aglycones, they can be divided into several groups: derivatives of medicagenic acid, oleanolic acid, zanhic acid, hederagenin and soyasapogenols. It is generally accepted that the structure of the aglycone determines the biological activity of glycosides although the sugar moiety can essentially modify this activity4–8. A broad spectrum of the biological properties of alfalfa saponins is attributed to the occurrence of medicagenic acid and hederagenin glycosides. They have been found to be fungistatic against many fungal strains such as:

Keywords

Medicagenic Acid Aerial Part Hemolytic Activity Oleanolic Acid Trichoderma Viride 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Jurzysta
    • 1
  • G. R. Waller
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryInstitute of Soil Science and Plant CultivationPulawyPoland
  2. 2.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Oklahoma Agricultural Experiment StationOklahoma State UniversityStillwaterUSA

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