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Experiences with Automated Sample Preparation in Bioanalysis

  • V. S. Picot
  • R. D. McDowall
Part of the Chromatographic Society Symposium Series book series (CSSS)

Summary

The automation of sample preparation within bioanalysis has been largely ignored and may now be regarded as the weak element in automated analysis. The reason is that sample preparation can be applicable to one method but not another. In addition, there are factors such as variation in the available sample volumes and the consistency or viscosity of biological samples, dilution or concentration steps may be required for some, but not all, samples. The particulate or semi-solid nature of some matrices may adversely affect an automated analysis if not taken into account.

Sample preparation is often considered as one of the rate limiting factors in many analytical methods. However it is probably the most critical factor for determining the accuracy and precision of analytical results, as well as for sample throughput and turnaround time. For these reasons, automation of sample preparation is now receiving more attention than before and more automatic systems are now being manufactured.

Here we discuss our experience with a wide range of automated sample preparation techniques, within the context of analysis for compounds (both endogenous and exogenous) in biological fluids.

Keywords

Automate Analysis Turnaround Time Laboratory Information Management System Column Switching Aqueous Mobile Phase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. S. Picot
    • 1
  • R. D. McDowall
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Bioanalytical SciencesWellcome Research LaboratoriesBeckenham, KentUK

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