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Regional Approaches to the Investigation of Past Human Biocultural Structure

  • Lyle W. Konigsberg
  • Jane E. Buikstra
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

The enormously influential volume by Brown (1971) arising out of the Social Dimensions of Mortuary Practices symposium clearly established that bioanthropological data are essential in assessing and analyzing the social persona of the deceased (Binford 1971:17). For that volume, individual interments were the unit of analysis and emphasis was placed on within-site variability of both cultural and biological attributes. The role of basic paleodemographic data in mortuary archaeology was thus firmly entrenched by that volume. Human biology is even more prominent in The Archaeology of Death (Chapman, Randsborg, and Kinnes 1981), published a decade after Social Dimensions. Not only were the final two chapters by biological anthropologists, but Chapman and Randsborg’s (1981:19) introduction emphasized that “the exciting changes in the analysis of skeletal materials by physical anthropologists” were among the developments that had “been particularly challenging and potentially most productive about the archaeology of death in the last decade.” The composition of the present volume indicates that the boundary between biological anthropology and archaeology has become even more permeable.

Keywords

Regional Approach Skeletal Remains Physical Anthropology Population Genetic Model American Archaeology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lyle W. Konigsberg
    • 1
  • Jane E. Buikstra
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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