Cognitive Functioning in Autism

An Overview
  • Leeanne Green
  • Deborah Fein
  • Stephen Joy
  • Lynn Waterhouse
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

Autism is a syndrome that is defined primarily in behavioral terms, but is universally associated with cognitive deficits of varying degrees. Theorists over the last 30 years have argued over the primacy of cognitive versus affective and behavioral symptoms. Regardless of how this debate is ultimately resolved, an understanding of cognitive processes in autism is prerequisite to a full understanding of how the syndrome develops, and is necessary for designing effective strategies to ameliorate these cognitive deficits. In normally developing children, cognitive development proceeds in concert with affective development, within the context of social relationships. The study of cognition in autism may contribute understanding not only to children affected with this syndrome, but also to the ways in which cognitive, social, and affective development can be dissociated in abnormal development.

Keywords

Schizophrenia Stim Haas Broman Rote 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leeanne Green
    • 1
  • Deborah Fein
    • 1
    • 2
  • Stephen Joy
    • 1
    • 3
  • Lynn Waterhouse
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory of NeuropsychologyBoston University School of MedicineBostonUSA
  3. 3.Albertus Magnus CollegeNew HavenUSA
  4. 4.Trenton State CollegeEwing TownshipUSA

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