Educational Approaches in Preschool

Behavior Techniques in a Public School Setting
  • Andrew S. Bondy
  • Lori A. Frost
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

Autism is a complex and often enigmatic developmental disability characterized by puzzling social communication. Whereas many people ponder how children with autism think about the world, others have studied how these children behave in the world they share with us. A behavioral approach to working with preschool children with autism emphasizes analyzing their actions in terms of the preceding circumstances and the ensuing consequences. This chapter addresses how one public school program integrated the technology associated with behavior analysis with the particular proclivities and aversions associated with children demonstrating this syndrome. We review both what is beneficial to teach such children and how their lessons can be effectively arranged.

Keywords

Assure Pyramid Nash pIer Shoe 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew S. Bondy
    • 1
  • Lori A. Frost
    • 2
  1. 1.Delaware Autistic ProgramNewarkUSA
  2. 2.Pyramid Educational ConsultantsCherry HillUSA

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