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Implicit Theories of Intelligence

Reconsidering the Role of Confidence in Achievement Motivation

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Part of the The Springer Series in Social Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

Self-confidence and its related constructs are among the most widely researched variables in the literature on achievement. However, findings on the link between self-confidence and achievement are not consistent. While some researchers have found significant correlations between self-confidence about one’s intellectual ability and achievement outcomes (e.g., Brookover & Passalacqua, 1981; J. G. Jones & Grieneeks, 1970; Marsh, 1984; Shavelson & Bolus, 1982; Shell, Murphy, & Bruning, 1989; for a review, see Hattie, 1992), others find only weak associations between the two variables (for a meta-analysis, see Hansford & Hattie, 1982).

Keywords

  • Junior High School
  • Intellectual Ability
  • Implicit Theory
  • Achievement Motivation
  • Entity Theorist

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Hong, Yy., Chiu, Cy., Dweck, C.S. (1995). Implicit Theories of Intelligence. In: Kernis, M.H. (eds) Efficacy, Agency, and Self-Esteem. The Springer Series in Social Clinical Psychology. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-1280-0_10

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-1280-0_10

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