Recent Upgrade of the in Vivo Neutron Activation Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

  • Ruimei Ma
  • F. Avraham Dilmanian
  • Harvey Rarback
  • Ion E. Stamatelatos
  • Mati Meron
  • Yakov Kamen
  • Seiichi Yasumura
  • David A. Weber
  • Leon J. Lidofsky
  • Richard N. PiersonJr.
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 60)

Abstract

The in vivo neutron activation (IVNA) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consists of a delayed-and a prompt-gamma neutron activation (DGNA and PGNA) system and an inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system. The total body contents of several basic elements, including potassium (TBK), calcium (TBCa), chlorine (TBC1), sodium (TBNa), and phosphorus (TBP) are measured at the DGNA1–3 system; total body carbon (TBC) is measured at the INS4 system; and the nitrogen-to-hydrogen ratio is measured at the PGNA system.5 Based on the elemental composition, body compartments, such as total body fat (TBF) and total body protein (TBPr), can be computed with additional independently measured parameters, such as total body water (TBW), body size, and body weight (BW).6

Keywords

Phosphorus Graphite Carbide Attenuation Osteoporosis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruimei Ma
    • 1
  • F. Avraham Dilmanian
    • 1
  • Harvey Rarback
    • 1
  • Ion E. Stamatelatos
    • 2
  • Mati Meron
    • 1
  • Yakov Kamen
    • 1
  • Seiichi Yasumura
    • 1
  • David A. Weber
    • 1
  • Leon J. Lidofsky
    • 3
  • Richard N. PiersonJr.
    • 4
  1. 1.Medical DepartmentBrookhaven National LaboratoryUptonUSA
  2. 2.Medical Physics Department, Medical SchoolUniversity of IoannianGreece
  3. 3.Department of Applied Physics and Nuclear EngineeringColumbia UniversityUSA
  4. 4.Body Composition UnitSt. Luke’s/Roosevelt HospitalNew YorkUSA

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