Human Body Composition pp 331-332

Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 60)

| Cite as

Effects of Meal and Its Electrolytes on Bioelectrical Impedance

  • Mikael Fogelholm
  • Harri Sievänen
  • Katriina Kukkonen-Harjula
  • Pekka Oja
  • Ilkka Vuori

Abstract

Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is a simple, reproducible and indirectly validated technique for the assessment of body composition1–3. It is based on the physical principle that the impedance (or conductivity) of a geometrical system is related to the conductor length and configuration, its cross-sectional area, and signal frequency4. Assuming a constant conductor configuration and using a fixed signal, the impedance becomes a function of conductor (body) volume. The conductive pathway is directly related to the water content of the body. Therefore, the conductivity is minimal in the less hydrated fat tissue and far greater in the fat—free body mass which contains virtually all the water and conducting electrolytes. In other words, the BIA is an index of total body water and evidently affected by the alterations in the concentration of conductive electrolytes5.

References

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    H.C. Lukaski et al., Validation of tetrapolar bioelectrical impedance method to assess human body composition, J Appl Physiol 60: 1327 (1986).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    A.S. Jackson et al., Reliability and validity of bioelectrical impedance in determining body composition, J Appl Physiol 64: 529 (1988).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    M.D. van Loan, Bioelectrical impedance analysis to determine fat—free mass, total body water and body fat, Sports Med 10: 205 (1990).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    R.F. Kushner, Bioelectrical impedance analysis: a review of principles and applications, J Am Coll Nutr 11: 199 (1992).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    P. Deurenberg et al., Factors affecting bioelectrical impedance measurements in humans, Eur J Clin Nutr 42: 1017 (1988).PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mikael Fogelholm
    • 1
  • Harri Sievänen
    • 2
  • Katriina Kukkonen-Harjula
    • 2
  • Pekka Oja
    • 2
  • Ilkka Vuori
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Applied Chemistry and MicrobiologyUniversity of HelsinkiFinland
  2. 2.The UKK Institute for Health Promotion ResearchTampereFinland

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