CT-Determined Body Composition Changes with Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Treatment to Adults with Growth Hormone Deficiency

  • Lars Lönn
  • Henry Kvist
  • Ulla Grangård
  • Bengt-Åke Bengtsson
  • Lars Sjöström
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 60)

Abstract

Growth hormone (GH) is secreted in children as well as in adults. Several studies show an important role of GH in adults. Recent trials with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) have demonstrated profound effects on body composition, metabolism and quality of life.1,2 Salomon et al1 showed that adults with growth hormone deficiency had decreased lean body mass and increased body fat. Treatment with rhGH for six months increased lean body mass (LBM) and reduced body fat. Jörgensen et al2 have shown that four months of GH substitution to GH-deficient adults had a normalizing effect on several physiological variables, which were out of normal range before treatment.

Keywords

Placebo Obesity Attenuation Adenoma Meningioma 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lars Lönn
    • 1
  • Henry Kvist
    • 1
  • Ulla Grangård
    • 1
  • Bengt-Åke Bengtsson
    • 2
  • Lars Sjöström
    • 2
  1. 1.Diagnostic RadiologyUniversity of Göteborg Sahlgrenska HospitalGöteborgSweden
  2. 2.Department of MedicineUniversity of Göteborg Sahlgrenska HospitalGöteborgSweden

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