Body Composition Measurements During Pregnancy

  • Sally Ann Lederman
  • Richard N. PiersonJr.
  • Jack Wang
  • Anne Paxton
  • John Thornton
  • Jose Wendel
  • Steven B. Heymsfield
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 60)

Abstract

Body composition is of particular interest during pregnancy, because the additional calorie increment estimated as necessary during pregnancy (about 250–300 kcal/day) is determined to a large extent by the amount of additional fat thought to be stored. Weight gain recommendations for pregnancy also assume certain fat changes occur during normal pregnancy.

Keywords

Bromide NaBr 

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References

  1. 1.
    Fidanza F. The density of fat-free body mass during pregnancy. Intl J Vit Nutr Res 1987; 57 (1): 104.Google Scholar
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    Van Raaij JMA, MEM Peek, SH Vermaat-Miedema, CM Schonk, JGAJ Hautvast. New equations for estimating body fat mass in pregnancy from body density or total body water. Am J Clin Nutr 1988; 48: 24–29.PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Hytten F and I Leitch (1971) The Physiology of Human Pregnancy 2nd ed., Blackwell Scientif is Publications, Oxford.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Selinger A. (1977) The Body as a Three Component System Doctoral Thesis, University of Illinois at Urbana.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sally Ann Lederman
    • 1
  • Richard N. PiersonJr.
  • Jack Wang
    • 2
  • Anne Paxton
    • 1
  • John Thornton
    • 2
  • Jose Wendel
    • 2
  • Steven B. Heymsfield
    • 2
  1. 1.Columbia University, School of Public HealthNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.St.Luke’s/Roosevelt Hospital CenterNew YorkUSA

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