Abstract

Visual—motor and visual—perceptual dysfunction may have a significant, adverse influence on a child’s school performance. Although visual—motor and visual—perceptual skills are highly interrelated, they also are distinct functions. A child with a visual—motor problem may not exhibit a visual—perceptual deficit; similarly, the reverse is also true (see Figure 11.1). If a child can draw rapidly (without excessive effort) but is unable to recognize that the reproduction differs markedly from the letter or shape being copied, there is a strong likelihood that an underlying perceptual deficit exists (Figure 11.1b). Conversely, if the child can recognize errors or discrepancies but, nonetheless, is unable to correct them, the probability of having a visual—motor problem is increased significantly (Figure 11.1c). A child who displays immature visual reproductions may be experiencing difficulty with the integration of perceptual and motor functions.1, 2

Keywords

Visual Motor Psychological Corporation Perceptual Deficit Visual Motor Integration Visual Retention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Glen P. Aylward
    • 1
  1. 1.Southern Illinois University School of MedicineSpringfieldUSA

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