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Ceramic Perspectives on Northern Anasazi Exchange

  • Eric Blinman
  • C. Dean Wilson
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

Although much discussion of Anasazi exchange is focused on the Chaco Anasazi (see Chapter 2), the Chacoan Phenomenon occurred within a broader context of Anasazi cultural development. In this chapter, we present what is known about Northern Anasazi exchange systems and cultural interaction without emphasizing the Chacoan system. Our use of the “Northern Anasazi” region is centered on the Four Corners area and encompass the Kayenta, Chuska, Chaco, Northern San Juan, and Upper San Juan subdivisions of the Anasazi (Figure 1). Our synthesis focuses on pottery distributions because of the strength of this data set. This emphasis on pottery limits our time frame to the a.d. 480–1300 period, from the earliest tree-ring dated pottery (Breternitz 1986) through the abandonment of the greater Four Corners area at the end of the Pueblo III period.

Keywords

American Antiquity Pottery Production Chaco Canyon Archaeological Program Ware Exchange 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric Blinman
    • 1
  • C. Dean Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.Museum of New MexicoOffice of Archaeological StudiesSanta FeUSA

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