Violent Crime and Mental Health

  • Rochelle F. Hanson
  • Dean G. Kilpatrick
  • Sherry A. Falsetti
  • Heidi S. Resnick
Part of the Springer Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Overview

Violent crime has become one of the most significant concerns among people today (Kilpatrick, Seymour, & Boyle, 1991), and rates of violent crime have risen substantially in America as well as in other countries around the world (Reiss & Roth, 1993; Rosenberg & Fenley, 1991). Many Americans have been victims of violent crime sometime during their lives, and many other Americans, who have not yet been victimized, fear becoming violent crime victims in the future (Kilpatrick et al., 1991). This fear of crime among Americans is not unfounded. In 1990, more than 23,000 people in the United States were homicide victims (Reiss & Roth, 1993), and over 6 million violent crimes were disclosed to interviewers from the National Crime Victimization Survey (Bureau of Justice Statistics, 1990). As a consequence, violent crime and fear of violent crime have become important antecedents of fear and anxiety in America. Moreover, violent crime is a predominant contributing factor to the development of mental health problems, most commonly, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (Breslau, Davis, Andreski, & Peterson, 1991; Kilpatrick et al., 1989; Resnick, Kilpatrick, Dansky, Saunders, & Best, 1993).

Keywords

Depression Europe Transportation Dementia Income 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rochelle F. Hanson
    • 1
  • Dean G. Kilpatrick
    • 2
  • Sherry A. Falsetti
    • 2
  • Heidi S. Resnick
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Sexual Assault/Abuse Recovery and Education (CARE), Student Health Care CenterUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA
  2. 2.National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesMedical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA

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