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Treatment of Torture Survivors

Psychosocial and Somatic Aspects
  • Peter Vesti
  • Marianne Kastrup
Part of the Springer Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

In Chapter 9 (this volume) we reviewed the medical, psychological, and social sequelae of torture. The present chapter focuses on issues concerning assessment and treatment. Treatment requires the cooperation of medical, psychological, and social disciplines, but here we emphasize the psychotherapy of torture survivors. Our experience stems mainly from the group of tortured refugees living in Denmark. These individuals have been seen at the International Rehabilitation Research Center for Torture Victims (RCT) located in Copenhagen, Denmark. Although the content of this chapter is based largely on clinical practice at the RCT, when appropriate we refer to clinical work at other specialized treatment centers located throughout the world.

Keywords

Traumatic Stress Mental Health Symptom Harvard Trauma Questionnaire Cambodian Refugee Current Treatment Approach 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Vesti
    • 1
  • Marianne Kastrup
    • 1
  1. 1.Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture VictimsCopenhagen KDenmark

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