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Inhibition of Fish Brain Acetylcholinesterase by Cadmium and Mercury

Interaction with Selenium
  • S. Sen
  • S. Mondal
  • J. Adhikari
  • D. Sarkar
  • S. Bose
  • B. Mukhopadhyay
  • Shelley Bhattacharya

Abstract

Industrial chemicals are known to affect the activity of cholinesterases where Se was found to have a negligible effect. It is also reported that Se reduces human cancer death rates. Such contradictory reports prompted us to study the role of Se in the inhibition of fish brain AChE caused by Cd and Hg. I 50 concentrations of Cd and Hg were found to be 20 uM and 62 nM respectively. Since Se showed no I 50, a lower (3.1 uM) and a higher (57 uM) concentration was used. Positive interaction of Se was clear when Hg was at I 50 added either before or after Se or together, and 50% inhibition was completely abolished and 100% activity was recorded. This effect of Se was observed at both the test concentrations. Interaction of Se and Cd was remarkably different recording significant inhibition at all test systems. The activation of Hg-inhibited AChE by Se may be due to acceleration of enzyme deacetylation. In the presence of Cd Se probably binds to the esteratic site more strongly to effect a conformational change thereby decreasing the AChE activity.

Keywords

AChE Activity Sodium Selenite Mercuric Chloride AChE Inhibition Cadmium Chloride 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Sen
    • 1
  • S. Mondal
    • 1
  • J. Adhikari
    • 1
  • D. Sarkar
    • 1
  • S. Bose
    • 1
  • B. Mukhopadhyay
    • 1
  • Shelley Bhattacharya
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental Toxicology Laboratory, Department of ZoologyVisva Bharati UniversitySantiniketanIndia

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