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Accelerator-Based Systems for Plutonium Destruction and Nuclear Waste Transmutation

  • E. D. Arthur

Abstract

Accelerator-base systems are described that can eliminate long-lived nuclear materials. The impact of these systems on global issues relating to plutonium minimization and nuclear waste disposal can be significant. An overview of the components that comprise these systems is given, along with discussion of technology development status and needs. A technology development plan is presented with emphasis on first steps that would demonstrate technical performance.

Keywords

Molten Salt Fission Product Spend Fuel Molten Salt Reactor Weapon Plutonium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. D. Arthur
    • 1
  1. 1.Los Alamos National LaboratoryLos AlamosUSA

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