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Seeds pp 273-292 | Cite as

Some Ecophysiological Aspects of Germination

  • J. Derek Bewley
  • Michael Black
Chapter

Abstract

We pointed out in the previous chapter that the biological importance of dormancy must be seen in relation to the ecology of germination—when and where a seed germinates. Interactions between the dormancy-releasing agents—light, temperature, and afterripening—and the sensitivity of germination to light, temperature, and, say, water stress are responsible for determining if a seed will germinate in a particular situation and season. The germination and dormancy mechanisms are therefore of great adaptive importance in ensuring that seedling emergence occurs at the most advantageous time and place. In this chapter we will consider some examples to illustrate the ecological significance of these control processes.

Keywords

Seed Bank Chenopodium Album Leaf Canopy Dormancy Breakage Persistent Seed Bank 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Useful Literature References

Section 6.2

  1. Bewley, J.D., and Black, M., 1982, Physiology and Biochemistry of Seeds, Volume 2, Springer, Berlin, Chapter 6 (ecophysiological aspects of seeds).Google Scholar
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Section 6.3

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Section 6.4

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Sections 6.5 and 6.7

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Section 6.8

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Section 6.9

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Derek Bewley
    • 1
  • Michael Black
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BotanyUniversity of GuelphGuelphCanada
  2. 2.Division of Life Sciences, King’s CollegeUniversity of LondonLondonEngland

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