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Equity and Balance in the Exchange of Contributions in Close Relationships

  • Susan Sprecher
  • Pepper Schwartz
Part of the Critical Issues in Social Justice book series (CISJ)

Abstract

Close relationships, particularly between men and women, are in transition. Brehm (1992) argues that one of the major changes in heterosexual relationships over the past two decades is increased egalitarianism. More and more marriages and other intimate relationships aspire to what has been called an equal-partner pattern (Scanzoni & Scanzoni, 1988). In these relationships, the partners are equally committed to work and domestic roles and contribute equally in other areas of the relationship as well. When relationship partners participate equally in important roles, do fairness and justice issues become less relevant? The answer seems to be no. The interchangeability of roles and the freedom to develop unique scripts in the close relationship can make issues of fairness and justice even more salient and problematic.

Keywords

Romantic Relationship Intimate Relationship Personal Relationship Relationship Satisfaction Married Couple 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan Sprecher
    • 1
  • Pepper Schwartz
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SociologyIllinois State UniversityNormalUSA
  2. 2.Department of SociologyUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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