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Historical Archaeology as I Saw It: 1935–1970

  • George I. Quimby

Abstract

In these modern times, historical archaeology in North America is a recognized and acknowledged specialization or even discipline that can be separated from other types of archaeology. There now exists a Society for Historical Archaeology and there is an expanding literature on the subject in various journal articles, monographs, and books both in Canada and the United States. But it was not at all like this in 1934 when I studied American archaeology at the University of Michigan and thereby became a participant-observer in the development of archaeology, including historical archaeology, from that time to the present. And thus having been associated with certain aspects of historical archaeology for more than forty years and now being regarded by my grandchildren as one who has first-hand knowledge of the “olden days,” it seems fitting to reflect on some of the influences of my boyhood and youth that attracted me to the study of archaeology.

Keywords

Historical Archaeology Mooring Line Great Lake Region Northwest Coast Field Museum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Quimby, George, 1937, Notes on Indian Trade Silver Ornaments in Michigan. Papers of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters 22:15–25.Google Scholar
  2. Quimby, George, 1938, Dated Indian Burials in Michigan. Papers of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters 23:63–74.Google Scholar
  3. Quimby, George, 1939, European Trade Articles as Chronological Indicators for the Archaeology of the Historic Period in Michigan. Papers of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters 24:25–35.Google Scholar
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  7. Quimby, George, 1961, The Pic River Site. In Lake Superior Copper and the Indians: Miscellaneous Studies of Great Lakes Prehistory, edited by James B. Griffin, pp. 83-89. Anthropological Papers Number 17, Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan.Google Scholar
  8. Quimby, George, 1966, Indian Culture and European Trade Goods; The Archaeology of the Historic Period in the Western Great Lakes Region. University of Wisconsin Press, Madison.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • George I. Quimby

There are no affiliations available

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