Complications of Combined Injury

Radiation Damage and Skin Wound Trauma in Mouse Models
  • G. David Ledney
  • Gary S. Madonna
  • Daniel G. McChesney
  • Thomas B. Elliott
  • Itzhak Brook

Abstract

During nuclear disasters, most casualties will receive radiation of various energies, qualities, and doses. In addition, many individuals will die from combined injury, i.e., radiation plus burn and/or wound traumas. Judgments about medical care for casualties with combined injuries, such as those in the Chernobyl accident,1 are difficult to make because clinical experience is limited, and data bases on relevant animal models are lacking. Investigators in our group are studying several complications of tissue trauma on irradiated mice to develop therapies for expected bacterial infections. Specifically, we are examining (1) the impact of radiation quality and type of injury on survival, (2) the effect of timing and extent of injury in combination with irradiation, (3) the hematopoietic responses after combined injury, and (4) the susceptibility of mice with combined injury to opportunistic and Klebsiella pneumoniae infections.

Keywords

Attenuation Cage Cobalt Polyethylene Pneumonia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. David Ledney
    • 1
  • Gary S. Madonna
    • 1
  • Daniel G. McChesney
    • 1
  • Thomas B. Elliott
    • 1
  • Itzhak Brook
    • 1
  1. 1.Experimental Hematology DepartmentArmed Forces Radiobiology Research InstituteBethesdaUSA

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