Environmental Pollution Policies in Light of Biotechnological Assessment: Organisation for Economic Cooperation, United Kingdom, and European Economic Council Perspectives

  • Alan T. Bull
  • Geoffrey Holt
  • David J. Hardman
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 45)

Abstract

In preparing this chapter, we have been struck by the correspondence of events in the 1960s and 1970s, when strategies for controlling pollution were first being developed in the United States and in other industrialized countries, with those in the 1980s, when the technological discontinuity of genetic engineering has forced itself upon pollution control as it has on so many other sectors of our everyday existence. The sequence of events, contradictions, and uncertainties that was driven by the adoption of technology-based standards for environmental management has its parallel now in the debate on deliberate release of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) and related biotechnology issues. The problems include: inadequate databases; a general underestimate of time, costs, and acceptance; the required listing of priority pollutants; and ill-considered questions of analysis, culminating in guidelines and regulations that mirror only a portion of reality (30).

Keywords

Biomass Fermentation Phenol Chlorophyll Pyrolysis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan T. Bull
    • 1
  • Geoffrey Holt
    • 1
  • David J. Hardman
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Biotechnological StudiesUniversity of KentCanterbury, KentUK

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