Psychometric Instruments Available for the Assessment of Autistic Children

  • Susan L. Parks
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

For many disorders of childhood, psychological assessment is viewed as a critical step in the formulation of an effective treatment plan. Descriptions of symptomatology are compiled, cognitive strengths and weaknesses evaluated, appropriate diagnoses made, and interventions begun. This logical progression has rarely been the experience of most families with an autistic child. Controversy over the diagnosis of autism has resulted in differing conceptions by various researchers and clinicians. Driven by these theoretical orientations, evaluations have tended to emphasize certain areas of deficit while ignoring other relevant features. Likewise, the special difficulties of autistic children have complicated the picture, making testing practices variable and undependable. The unfortunate labeling of autistic children as “untestable” has taken many years to overcome. But slowly and surely, the importance of thorough assessment has come to be recognized as invaluable. With that recognition has come the development of several instruments designed specifically for use with an autistic population. Most of these measures have been developed to aid the diagnostic process. Others have focused on targeting specific areas for intervention efforts. Both types of assessments are reviewed here. In addition, some modifications of more widely known standardized tests are also discussed.

Keywords

Schizophrenia Serotonin Aphasia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan L. Parks
    • 1
  1. 1.Villa Maria Residential Treatment CenterTimoniumUSA

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