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The Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth in the Interior Pacific Northwest

  • Richard R. Mason
  • Boyd E. Wickman
Part of the Population Ecology book series (POPE)

Abstract

The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), is a common defoliator of fir in the interior forests of western North America. It is one of four western species of Orgyia, but it is the only member of the group that occasionally reaches outbreak numbers while feeding exclusively on conifers.24 Because of the explosive and destructive nature of its outbreaks, the Douglas-fir tussock moth has achieved much deserved notoriety among forest managers. For this reason, considerable effort has been made in recent years to understand the dynamics of tussock moth populations and to develop methods for minimizing their impact.11

Keywords

Natural Enemy Bark Beetle Tree Mortality Pheromone Trap Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard R. Mason
    • 1
  • Boyd E. Wickman
    • 1
  1. 1.Forestry and Range Sciences LaboratoryU.S. Forest ServiceLa GrandeUSA

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