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The Larch Cone Fly in the French Alps

  • Alain Roques
Part of the Population Ecology book series (POPE)

Abstract

Among the pest species that damage larch cones in Eurasia, the larch cone fly, Lasiomma melania Ackland (Diptera: Anthomyiidae), is undoubtedly one of the most serious. The genus Lasiomma contains at least three closely related species that attack larch cones in the same areas: L. melania, L. laricicola Karl, and L. infrequens Ackland. These three species, previously known under the name of Lasiomma (= Chortophila = Phorbia = Hylemya)laricicola Karl, were separated in 1965 on the basis of male characters1 and later using female characters.34 Thus, much cone damage attributed to the single species, L. laricicola, in Europe and the Soviet Union during the first half of the twentieth century, was probably also attributable to the two other species. For example, L. melania is generally the dominant species in the French Alps, even though it was only discovered in 1975 in this region.34 Today, the presence of L. melania is well established in Western Europe,1,17,34,35 in the Soviet Union from the European part to the Far Eastern regions,8,12,31,48,49 and in China.9 The larch cone fly is restricted to Larix cones but damages various species and subspecies of this genus according to region, including European larch (L. decidua), Siberian larch (L. sibirica), Dahurian larch (L. gmelini), and Japanese larch (L. leptolepis = L. kaempferi). Thus, its geographic range probably covers the major part of the Eurasian natural distribution area of the genus Larix, as well as the western European regions in which these conifers have been introduced.

Keywords

Cone Production Siberian Larch Larix Decidua European Larch Late Frost 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alain Roques
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut National de la Recherche AgronomiqueINRA-CRF-Station de Zoologie ForestièreArdon, OlivetFrance

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