Babes in Arms

Object Relations and Fantasies of Annihilation
  • John M. Broughton

Abstract

The umbilicus of the 1990s is hardly severed, yet the neonate cries out the message of fresh and vigorous surface-to-surface contacts between the great powers. The American president is no longer seen as a “missile-toting cowboy”; he is now “kind Uncle Sam” in Mr. Gorbachev’s eyes. Last Christmas, kids dragged their parents to Bloomingdale’s or the U.N. to catch a glimpse of the supreme Soviet. In the fairy-tale world of newscasting, the unprecedented traffic snarl-ups resulting from his visit were affectionately dubbed “Gorbilock.” This Christmas, Eastern Europe seems to be blossoming early while Lithuania prepares for self-emancipation. Even Castro confronts voluble demands for reform.

Keywords

Recombination Schizophrenia Posit Stein Arena 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. Broughton
    • 1
  1. 1.Teachers CollegeColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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