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Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide (VIP) and the Specific Motor Response to Capsaicin of the Human Isolated Ileum

  • Carlo Alberto Maggi
  • Sandro Giuliani
  • Paolo Santicioli
  • Riccardo Patacchini
  • Elvar Theodorsson
  • Damiano Turini
  • Gabriele Barbanti
  • Antonio Giachetti
  • Alberto Meli
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 298)

Abstract

Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of many red peppers, has been shown to possess a selective stimulant action on certain neuropeptide-containing primary afferents which are widely distributed in the gastrointestinal tract of several species (Maggi and Meli 1988 and Holzer 1988 for reviews). On isolated gut segments from rats or guinea pigs, capsaicin exerts a variety of motor responses (contraction, relaxation or both) which depend upon the release from sensory nerves of certain neuropeptides, such as tachykinins or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) (see as examples Barthó et al., 1987; Maggi et al., 1986; 1988a). A specific feature of the action of capsaicin on sensory nerves is represented by desensitization, which means that after a single application of a maximally effective concentration of capsaicin the sensory fibers become unresponsive to subsequent applications of this drug.

Keywords

Sensory Nerve Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide Longitudinal Muscle Human Small Intestine Longitudinal Strip 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carlo Alberto Maggi
    • 1
  • Sandro Giuliani
    • 1
  • Paolo Santicioli
    • 1
  • Riccardo Patacchini
    • 1
  • Elvar Theodorsson
    • 2
  • Damiano Turini
    • 3
  • Gabriele Barbanti
    • 3
  • Antonio Giachetti
    • 1
  • Alberto Meli
    • 1
  1. 1.Pharmacology Department, Smooth Muscle Division, Research LaboratoriesA. Menarini PharmaceuticalsFlorenceItaly
  2. 2.Department of Clinical ChemistryKarolinska HospitalStockholmSweden
  3. 3.Dept. of Surgical Pathology and Urologic ClinicUniversity of FerraraItaly

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