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Cognitive Rehabilitation after Head Trauma

Toward an Integrated Cognitive/Behavioral Perspective on Intervention
  • Linda Warren Duke
  • Sherry L. Weathers
  • Sandra G. Caldwell
  • Thomas A. Novack
Chapter
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Cognitive interventions are increasingly used and accepted as components of rehabilitation programs after head trauma. A number of recent reviews assess the general effectiveness of cognitive retraining in general (Butler & Namerow, 1988; Gouvier, Webster, & Blanton, 1986; Rimmele & Hester, 1987). Others have reviewed the effectiveness of particular cognitive rehabilitation programs (Ben-Yishay, Rattok, Lakin, Piasetsky, Ross, Silver, Zide, & Ezrachi, 1985; Prigatano, 1987; Williams, 1987) and of retraining in specific cognitive domains, such as attention (Sohlberg & Mateer, 1987; Wood, 1986) and memory (Glisky & Schacter, 1986). Despite varying perspectives among practitioners, a general consensus appears to be evolving regarding effective intervention strategies, and this consensus is reflected in current cognitive rehabilitation texts (Adamovich, Henderson, & Auerbach, 1985; Najenson, Rahmani, Elazar, & Auerbach, 1984; Sohlberg & Mateer, 1989; Szekeres, Ylvisaker, & Holland, 1985; Trexler, 1982).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda Warren Duke
    • 1
  • Sherry L. Weathers
    • 1
  • Sandra G. Caldwell
    • 1
  • Thomas A. Novack
    • 1
  1. 1.Spain Rehabilitation Center, Department of Rehab MedicineUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham School of MedicineBirminghamUSA

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