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Psychodynamic Models

  • Howard D. Lerner
  • Joshua Ehrlich
Part of the Perspectives in Developmental Psychology book series (PDPS)

Abstract

Psychoanalysis does not offer a single, coherent account of social development across the life cycle. This is so for two broad reasons. First, psychoanalysis does not represent one unified, tightly knit theory. Rather, as we explore in the first section of this chapter, it represents four internally consistent theoretical models, models that intersect and overlap but that cannot be readily melded into a single theory of psychoanalysis. Each model offers its own perspective on social development. Second, from the perspective of psychoanalytic theorists, social development is too complex and multiply determined to elaborate in terms of a single thread that extends through the lifespan. In this chapter, therefore, we examine social development in terms of eight “dimensions of development.” These dimensions, as we will articulate, interdigitate with one another in complex ways. However, we will consider each separately in order to offer some idea of the rich tapestry that comprises social development from the perspective of psychoanalytic theory.

Keywords

Object Representation Developmental Task Adult Development Psychoanalytic Theory Formal Operation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Howard D. Lerner
    • 1
  • Joshua Ehrlich
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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