Adult Development and Aging

  • Asenath La Rue
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

This chapter continues the discussion of developmental aspects of neuropsychological assessment, examining age-related changes in the last half of the life span. Old age, like early development, is a time of rapid change within all levels of the organism. Many late-life changes are poorly understood, but there are enough descriptive data to indicate that advanced age is a critical individual difference parameter.

Keywords

Depression Dopamine Covariance Dementia Shrinkage 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Asenath La Rue
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral SciencesUniversity of California at Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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