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Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions for Age-Related Memory Impairment

  • Linda Warren Duke
  • William E. Haley
  • Thomas F. Bergquist
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Annie Smith is a 72-year-old widowed woman who responded to an advertisement for volunteers interested in learning skills to improve their memory functions. Although she continues to live an active and independent life, managing all of her own household and financial affairs and volunteering two days per week at a local hospital, she reports a number of memory problems that are sources of embarrassment and inconvenience in her daily life. Most of these problems are focused around several situations that are important to her. First, at church, she finds herself having difficulty remembering the names of some of the other members of her congregation. When in a crowd of people, she often has trouble remembering what people have told her; she may lose her train of thought or have trouble finding the right words. On several occasions, she has forgotten to put her money into her purse before going to church, and has been embarrassed at being unable to give her offering. Mrs. Smith has played bridge with a small group of women on a weekly basis over the past 12 years. Lately, she notes that she forgets the cards which have been played, and has occasionally even forgotten the bid. While she used to take pride in her ability to do her grocery shopping completely from memory, lately she has relied on making hurried lists on scraps of paper, which she frequently cannot find in her purse. She also misplaces important objects, such as her eyeglasses or purse, while at home. Sometimes she spends hours looking for lost bills or objects. She is also distressed that she is unable to remember friends’ telephone numbers, and relies on her address book for all of this information.

Keywords

Memory Impairment Memory Problem Memory Complaint Memory Training Subjective Memory Complaint 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda Warren Duke
    • 1
  • William E. Haley
    • 1
  • Thomas F. Bergquist
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA

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