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Afro-Surinamese Ethnopsychiatry

A Transcultural Approach
  • Charles J. Wooding
Part of the Topics in Social Psychiatry book series (TSPS)

Abstract

Shortly before and after the political independence of Suriname in 1975, migration to the Netherlands increased significantly and the practitioners of orthodox medicine were confronted, more than in the past, with individuals who attributed their problems to supernatural causes. These people complained that their disorders were diagnosed from a biomedical viewpoint and treated with biomedicine while this kind of therapy was not always necessary and effective.

Keywords

Functional Disorder Evil Spirit African Health Orthodox Medicine Black Magic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles J. Wooding
    • 1
  1. 1.Den HaagThe Netherlands

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