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Personality Inventories and Projective Measures

  • Stewart Gabel
  • Gerald D. Oster
  • Steven M. Butnik

Abstract

In order to study and measure personality, regardless of theoretical orientation, methods of assessing personality variables are necessary. There are today literally hundreds of different tests available for psychologists to use in assessing personality differences. The tests vary from objective self-report questionnaires to tests which emphasize personal style and expression. Techniques such as inkblots, story telling, figure drawings, play construction, reactions to humor, adjective descriptions, and role playing have all been used as means by which to gather information about an individual’s personality makeup.

Keywords

Personality Inventory Projective Measure Projective Technique Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Comprehensive System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stewart Gabel
    • 1
  • Gerald D. Oster
    • 2
  • Steven M. Butnik
    • 3
  1. 1.New York Hospital-Cornell Medical CenterWhite PlainsUSA
  2. 2.Regional Institute for Children and Adolescents (RICA)RockvilleUSA
  3. 3.Independent PracticeRichmondUSA

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