Snyder’s Classification System for Therapeutic Interviews

  • William U. Snyder
Part of the Emotions, Personality, and Psychotherapy book series (EPPS)

Abstract

In 1943, I devised a system of categories, with later modifications, to be used for conducting research and training in psychotherapeutic interviewing and counseling. The two-way classification system includes categories primarily descriptive of the interaction between counselor or therapist verbal responses and the content and affect of client verbal responses. These systems have been used in many research projects since they were first developed. They are introduced below with brief descriptions, examples, and coding symbols. Some 1963 additions follow the presentation of the original systems.

Keywords

Attenuation Clarification 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • William U. Snyder
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyOhio UniversityAthensUSA

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