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The National High Blood Pressure Education Program

An Example of Social Marketing in Action
  • Graham W. Ward

Abstract

Hypertension is one of the most prevalent chronic disease conditions in the United States. Approximately 35 million Americans, about 1 in 6, have high blood pressure that warrants some form of treatment. An additional 25 million are estimated to have borderline high blood pressure that requires medical surveillance. Untreated hypertension is the largest single contributor to stroke and a major contributor to heart disease and kidney failure. It is these complications caused by hypertension rather than hypertension itself that generally results in hospitalization. Hypertension is more common among blacks than whites—about 1 out of 4 blacks has definite high blood pressure, contrasted to 1 in 6 in the general population.

Keywords

High Blood Pressure Hypertension Control Educational Exhibit National High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Education Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Haines, C., & Ward, G. Recent trends in public knowledge, attitudes and reported behavior with respect to high blood pressure. Public Health Reports, 1981, 96(6), 514–522.PubMedGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Graham W. Ward
    • 1
  1. 1.School of MedicineTufts UniversityBostonUSA

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