Pollution pp 320-330 | Cite as

Environmental Problems and Solutions Associated with the Development of the World’s Largest Lead Mining District

  • J. Charles Jennett
  • Bobby G. Wixson
  • Ernst Bolter
  • James O. Pierce
Chapter
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 2)

Abstract

The world’s most modern lead industries have developed in the remote Ozarks region of S. E. Missouri during the past five years. In 1970 the “Viburnum Trend” of “New Lead Belt” ranked first in the world by producing 432,576 tons of lead ore, and in 1971 continued to pace the United States in lead production. This industrial development in a sparsely populated rural forest region has resulted in the release of lead, copper, zinc, cadmium and other metals into a formerly unaffected ecosystem. Due to this abrupt change, the mining district has become an unique area for studying the impact of trace metals on a wide variety of bio-geochemical systems and developing new techniques to control detrimental effects. See Figure 1 for the area location. Pollution abatement studies have been conducted since 1967 and during the past 15 months, an interdisciplinary team supported by the National Science Foundation RANN program with the assistance of local citizens, the mining industry, concerned local, state and Federal agencies, have continued with an extensive investigation on the possible environmental effects of this industrial development. A complete report of this investigation has been published.1

Keywords

Zinc Toxicity Phosphorus Corn Dust 

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Bibliography

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Charles Jennett
    • 1
  • Bobby G. Wixson
    • 1
  • Ernst Bolter
    • 1
  • James O. Pierce
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Missouri-Rolla and ColumbiaUSA

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