Epilogue

  • Jay D. Humphrey
  • Sherry L. Delange
Chapter

Abstract

Biomechanics is often defined as “mechanics applied to biology” (Fung, 1993). Although this is certainly true, it is hoped that the reader now appreciates that biomechanics can and must be much more. Because of the complexity of tissue structure and behavior, there is a need for new, sophisticated theoretical frameworks; because of the continuing lack of data, there is a need for new, clever experiments; because of the geometric complexity of cells, tissues, and organs, there is a need for robust computational methods; and because of the significant morbidity and mortality that results from disease and injury, there is a need for improved modalities for diagnosis and treatment. Clearly then, we must continue to expand the scope of biomechanics, to seek new concepts, postulates, technologies, and techniques upon which a rigorous understanding can be based. Biomechanics is thus better defined as the development, extension, and application of mechanics to answer problems of importance in biology and medicine. Biomechanics is a vibrant field—one with great promise.

Keywords

Entropy Migration Catheter Microwave Metaphor 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jay D. Humphrey
    • 1
  • Sherry L. Delange
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biomedical Engineering and M. E. DeBakey InstituteTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA

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