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Diagnostic Issues, Criteria, and Comorbidity of Dissociative Disorders

  • Etzel Cardeña
  • David Spiegel

Abstract

While the interest in and concern with the dissociative disorders have grown exponentially in the last decade, with annual conventions, a journal exclusively devoted to dissociation, monographs, and so forth, this state of affairs represents more a rediscovery of concepts and phenomena than a brand new area of inquiry (cf. Spiegel & Cardeña,1991; van der Kolk & van der Hart, 1989). Hysteria, a concept closely connected with the dissociative disorders, can be traced back at least to Pharaonic Egypt (cf. Kihlstrom, 1994). Closer to our times, just about every one of the forebears of modern psychopathology studied disorders involving a “disruption in the usually integrated functions of consciousness, memory, identity, or perception of the environment” (American Psychiatric Association, 1994, p. 477). For example, Breuer and Freud, Pierre Janet, William James, and Morton Prince, among a longer list of distinguished psychologists at the turn of the century, all described fascinating cases of pronounced shifts in identity, memory, somatic reactivity, and consciousness.

Keywords

Eating Disorder Personality Disorder Borderline Personality Disorder Transient Global Amnesia General Medical Condition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Etzel Cardeña
    • 1
  • David Spiegel
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniformed Services University of the Health SciencesBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA

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