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Late-Life Depression

  • Leah P. Dick
  • Dolores Gallagher-Thompson
Part of the The Springer Series in Adult Development and Aging book series (SSAD)

Abstract

Mrs. B is a 64-year-old retired teacher who is caring for her husband with Alzheimer’s disease. He has required care for 5 years. Mrs. B took an early retirement from teaching high school English 4 years ago when her husband’s health severely declined. She reports a good relationship with her husband and their two children. Mrs. B is visiting her rheumatologist because of leg pain from her arthritis and sleeping difficulties due to the discomfort. The physician comments that her tone of voice reflects exhaustion or a “blue mood.” Mrs B shrugs her shoulders and sighs, “I guess it is all part of getting old.”

Keywords

Suicidal Ideation Beck Depression Inventory Family Caregiver Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor Geriatric Depression Scale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leah P. Dick
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dolores Gallagher-Thompson
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical CenterVeterans Affairs Medical CenterPalo AltoUSA
  2. 2.Stanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA

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