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Effect of Cold Acclimation on Membrane Lipid Composition and Freeze-Induced Membrane Destablization

  • Matsuo Uemura
  • Peter L. Steponkus

Abstract

Freezing injury is primarily a consequence of membrane destabilization resulting from freeze-induced dehydration (Steponkus, 1984). Although all cellular membranes are vulnerable to freeze-induced destabilization, the plasma membrane is of primary importance because of the critical role it plays during a freeze/thaw cycle. The plasma membrane is the principal interface between the extracellular medium and the cytoplasm and acts as a semipermeable barrier allowing for the efflux/influx of water during a freeze/ thaw cycle. In addition, the plasma membrane prevents seeding of the intracellular solution by extracellular ice. Thus, whether the cell survives during a freeze/thaw cycle is ultimately a consequence of the stability of the plasma membrane.

Keywords

Cold Acclimation Freezing Tolerance Plasma Membrane Lipid Membrane Lipid Composition Chloroplast Envelope 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matsuo Uemura
    • 1
  • Peter L. Steponkus
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Soil, Crop, and Atmospheric SciencesCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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