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Characterization of Antifreeze Proteins from Winter Rye

  • M. Griffith
  • A. Mlynarz
  • W. C. Hon
  • F. Sicheri
  • D. S. C. Yang
  • M. Antikainen
  • K. Pihakaski-Maunsbach

Abstract

When winter settles upon the landscape and the soil and lakes have frozen, it is important to realize that many biological organisms have frozen too. After a period of acclimatization to cold autumn temperatures and short daylengths, multicellular organisms ranging from fungi to perennial plants to frogs develop the ability to survive subzero temperatures by forming ice within their tissues. Freezing does not occur throughout these organisms; instead, ice forms only outside the cells in specific locations within the tissues.

Keywords

Cold Acclimation Antifreeze Protein Freezing Event Antifreeze Activity Apoplastic Protein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Griffith
    • 1
  • A. Mlynarz
    • 1
  • W. C. Hon
    • 2
  • F. Sicheri
    • 2
  • D. S. C. Yang
    • 2
  • M. Antikainen
    • 3
  • K. Pihakaski-Maunsbach
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of WaterlooWaterlooCanada
  2. 2.Department of BiochemistryMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada
  3. 3.Department of BiologyUniversity of TurkuTurkuFinland

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