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Significance of Endophyte Toxicoses and Current Practices in Dealing with the Problem in Australia and New Zealand

  • Janet Z. Foot

Abstract

The main toxicoses caused by the presence of Neotyphodium endophytes in Australia and New Zealand occur in animals grazing perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) containing Neotyphodium lolii. Neotyphodium coenophialum is rarely present in tall fescue sown in pastures in Australia and New Zealand. In any case tall fescue pastures are less frequently sown than perennial ryegrass. Perennial ryegrass is the major pasture grass in New Zealand (about 7 million hectares) and is important in the high winter rainfall areas in Australia (about 6 million hectares).

Keywords

Heat Stress White Clover Tall Fescue Perennial Ryegrass Fecal Moisture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janet Z. Foot
    • 1
  1. 1.Hamilton, VictoriaAustralia

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