Cellular and Molecular Techniques for Characterising Neotyphodium/Grass Interactions

  • Ian Garthwaite

Abstract

Cellular and molecular techniques have developed at a rapid pace over the past decade. This technology, often described under the umbrella term “Biotechnology”, is a collection of methods which have application in many varied areas of research but rely on a common technology core. These methods generally have their roots in biochemistry, with molecular techniques being developed alongside antibody technology and the more traditional methodologies. The key to the application of these technologies to any given field of work is to know how, and most importantly at what stage, to apply each technique to the problem in question.

Keywords

Clay Starch Aniline Indole Argentina 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ian Garthwaite
    • 1
  1. 1.Ruakura Research CentreAgResearch RuakuraHamiltonNew Zealand

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