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Investigation of Interactions Between Acremonium Uncinatum in Festuca Pratensis and Various Nematode Species in the Soil

  • W. Schöberlein
  • St. Eggestein
  • M. Pfannmöller
  • M. Szabová

Abstract

Parasitizing soil nematodes may develop high population intensities depending on local conditions, but above all on the cultivated crop. These parasites do not only feed on the plants, in many cases the plants present also a temporary or permanent living space for the nematodes. Typical host plants favour a very fast increase of nematode populations, whereas the presence of enemy plants downsizes a population considerably. It is well known that also some of the numerous fungus species occurring in the soil function as antagonists of soil nematodes (Decker, 1969; Sikora, 1996). Thus, the question arises what influence is exerted by endophyte-infested grass plants on nematode populations in the soil.

Keywords

Tall Fescue Nematode Species Nematode Population Soil Nematode Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Decker, H., 1969. Phytonematologie. VEB Deutscher Landwirtschaftsverlag, Berlin.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Schöberlein
    • 1
  • St. Eggestein
    • 1
  • M. Pfannmöller
    • 1
  • M. Szabová
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Agronomy and Crop Science - Seed ScienceMartin-Luther-University Halle-WittenbergHalleGermany
  2. 2.Parasitological Institute of the Slovakian Academy of ScienceKosiceSlovakia

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