Loschmidt’s Papers “Experimental-Untersuchungen über die Diffusion von Gasen ohne Poröse Scheidewände”

  • Othmar Preining

Abstract

Loschmidt’s two papers on diffusion1,2 were of great importance for the development of physics since they were closely connected with the acceptance of the atomic hypothesis. They were an essential element in the development of the new concept, and the atomic hypothesis was the key to the modern world view. So Feynman3, at the beginning of his famous lectures, puts the question: “If, in any cataclysm, all of scientific knowledge were to be destroyed, and only one sentence passed on to the next generations of creatures, what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words?” and he answers: “I believe it is the atomic hypothesis (or the atomic fact, or whatever you wish to call it) that all things are made of atoms — little particles that move around in perpetual motion, attracting each other when they are a little distance apart, but repelling upon being squeezed into one another. In that one sentence, you will see, there is an enormous amount of information about the world, if just a little imagination and thinking are applied.”

Keywords

Dioxide Lide 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    J. Loschmidt, Experimental-Untersuchungen über die Diffusion von Gasen ohne poröse Scheidewände I, Sitzungsber. Kais. Akad. Wiss. Wien, Math.-Naturwiss. Kl., 61, 367 (1870).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    J. Loschmidt, Experimental-Untersuchungen über die Diffusion von Gasen ohne poröse Scheidewände II, Sitzungsber. Kais. Akad. Wiss. Wien, Math.-Naturwiss. Kl., 62, 468 (1870).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    R. P. Feynman, The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Addison-Wesley, MA 1963, pp. 1-2.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    J. F. Hessler, Lehrbuch der Physik, Wilhelm Braumüller, Wien 1852, p. 329.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Hessler-Pisko, Lehrbuch der Technischen Physik, Wilhelm Braumüller, Wien 1866, p. 337.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    J. Müller, Lehrbuch der Physik und Meteorologie, Vieweg, Braunschweig 1853, p. 187.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Müller-Pouillet’s Lehrbuch der Physik und Meteorologie, neunte Aufl. von Leop. Pfaundler, Vieweg, Braunschweig 1886, p. 603.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    W. Eisenlohr, Lehrbuch der Physik, Krais und Hoffmann, Stuttgart 1860, p. 138.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    C. L. Berthollet, Mém. de la Soc. d’Arcueil, T. II. p. 463, quoted from T. Graham: Ueber das Eindringen der Gase in einander und deren Trennung durch mechanische Mittel, Ann. Phys. Chem., 17, 341 (1829).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    J. C. Maxwell, On the Dynamical Theory of Gases, Phil. Mag. [4], 35, 201 (1868).Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    J. Stefan, Über die dynamische Theorie der Diffusion der Gase, Sitzungsber. Kais. Akad. Wiss., Wien On the Dynamical Theory of Gases, Math.-Naturwiss. Kl., 65, 323 (1872).Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    J. C. Maxwell, A Discourse on Molecules, Phil. Mag. [4], 46, 453 (1873).Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    J. O. Hirschfelder, D. F. Curtis, R. B. Bird, Molecular Theory of Gases and Liquids, Wiley, New York 1954.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    S. Chapman, T. G. Cowling, The Mathematical Theory of Non-Uniform Gases, 3rd edition, Cambridge 1970.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    D. R. Lide, ed., CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, CRC Press, Boca Raton 1994.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Othmar Preining
    • 1
  1. 1.Austrian Academy of SciencesClean Air CommissionViennaAustria

Personalised recommendations