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Coping with Environmental Uncertainty by Social Learning

The Case of Agricultural Biotechnology Regulation in Europe
  • Susan Carr
  • Les Levidow

Abstract

The safety regulation of agricultural biotechnology has proved difficult for European harmonisation. Under the Deliberate Release Directive, EEC 90/220, genetically modified organisms (GMOs) must undergo a Europe-wide procedure to obtain market approval. Applications for approval have led to lengthy disputes, which have revealed strong differences among member states despite the supposedly common regulatory framework.

Keywords

Member State Social Learning Competent Authority Environmental Uncertainty Agricultural Biotechnology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan Carr
    • 1
  • Les Levidow
    • 1
  1. 1.Systems Department, Faculty of TechnologyThe Open UniversityMilton KeynesUK

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