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Fostering Family Adaptation

  • Louise Margaret Smith
  • Hamish P. D. Godfrey
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Families face a myriad of adverse changes in role functioning, financial status, and expectations for their future following traumatic brain injury (TBI) to a family member. The impact of these changes is frequently depression, anxiety, anger, and guilt (Lezak, 1978; Livingston et al., 1985a,b; Shaw & McMahon, 1990), with some research going so far as to suggest that family members may become even more burdened than the individual who has been injured (Brooks, 1991). Burden escalates over time and is associated with the severity of the TBI individual’s cognitive and social problems (Livingston, 1985b; Oddy et al., 1978a). Family burden also tends to be chronic. For example, Brooks (1991) reports that 89% of the relatives he studied reported medium to high levels of subjective burden 5 years following the occurrence of the injury.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Education Session Traumatic Brain Injury Patient Realistic Expectation Communication Skill Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Louise Margaret Smith
    • 1
  • Hamish P. D. Godfrey
    • 1
  1. 1.University of OtagoDunedinNew Zealand

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